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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
killed in a u.s. drone strike in the pakistani region of north waziristan. the attack targeted a home with a pair of missiles. pakistani intelligence says the victims were suspected militants. the syrian government is accusing western leaders of drumming up support for foreign military intervention by invoking a month on fears of chemical weapons. this week, president obama warned president bashar al-assad against chemical weapons, about an unspecified consequences. speaking to leaders in brussels, hillary clinton followed suit. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime may turn to chemical weapons, or may lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. so as part of the absolute unity we have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. those responsible would be held to account. >> in response to the threat, assad's regime has assisted it will not use chemical weapons against its own people, calling an assertion to the contrary to a pretext for intervention. >timothy geithner is says t
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
traders criminally charged here in the u.s. you look at the e-mails here and you understand. i need you to keep it as little as possible. if you do that, i will pay you. whatever you want. i am a man of my word. that may give you a reason to be angry. our question today is, does it give you a reason to avoid banking stocks as investment completely. charles payne is here, as he is every day. you had barclays and now you have ubs. more litigation heading over these guys. charles: bank of america is up like 100%. i am too afraid of these kind of thanks. i did not like the risk reward. i think there are a lot of on answered questions with what is brewing to meet the surface there. we have morgan stanley as a trade. i do like goldman sachs. i like the comparisons, more than anything else. listening, volume is down. also, we have regulations. at least we know what it is. lower margins because of price transparency. they admit they will lose revenue. all of that stuff is out there. connell: goldman had a settlement of its own on a different story. not love or talk up on on a financial crisis i
in the conversation to the detriment of us in the u.s. >> you have seen some of that already because of our crazy taxes and corporate profits. unfortunately other countries are committing the same sense. a handful of countries get it right. singapore, they will get that investment. in europe there are some countries getting it right like sweden, poland, bulgaria, the baltic states, but the major players are doing the same poison as things that we're trying to do here. lori: thanks you so much for coming in. in joined the conversation. adam: thank you. we are going to talk about something investors to follow financial stocks. then sweepstakes. coming to an end, details that people might have skin in this camera going to want to pay attention to. >> sources are telling the fox business network that they are finalizing the agreement. he's working in now with cantor fitzgerald. we should point out, this deal is not finalized. they have not signed the paper, but from what we understand they are in advanced talks to do a final deal. pretty interesting. in -- someone who cover the financial crisis. this
to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, congressional leaders will meet with the president this afternoon. i remember standing on the white house north lawn last month, after leaders met with the president back then. things looked pretty promising. here's what they said after that meeting. >> i believe that the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> i feel confident that a solution may be in sight. >> it was a constructive meeting. we all understand where we are. >> we feel very comfortable with each other and this isn't something we're going to wait until the last day of december to get it done. >> isn't that special? now we're in the last days of december. and with just three days to go, the rhetoric has changed in the beltway. these are the latest comments. >> republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward, just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
bit. economic news and new data shows u.s. manufacturing falling to its lowest level in three years. and there is a little nervousness about the president taking to twitter at 2:00 p.m. eastern time to talk about the fiscal cliff negotiations that are going on. but it is the first trading day of the month and some on wall street are getting bullish for year end. it is going to be a december to remember, i predict it. >> i think this is one of the reasons we're holding up so well, because december is the best month of the year and we roll into january which is also a very good month. let me show you some sectors that do especially well in the month of december. there's major sectors here. this is the best performing sectors in the month of december, averaged over the last ten years. you can see it is a diverse group -- health care, telecom, utilities. a lots of people play dividend at the end of the year. energy and materials a little bit deceptive. for example, energy has only been up a few of the last decembers. it's had a couple of real terrific decembers. i want to note there's o
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
have marginal movement, the cac up 4.2%. the ftse 100 up above .23%. >> u.s. equity futures at this hour -- whoa. hold it. >> what are you looking at? u.s. equity futures. >> it's okay on. didn't we already do this? >> i don't care. i really don't. the new prompter is giving you fits. and yesterday, it ended with a -- did you see that one yesterday? a word ended with a n and the next one i introduced the like like t. boone pickens or something like that. >> we have a new teleprompter and it adds words. >> that's special. >> and people that, you know, that's where we get all of our info, right out of that baby there. anyway, futures are up 14 points. 13114 is where we are right now. i don't know. fiscal cliff is three days away and we're still above 13,000. that's what we're talking about. you would think if the growth was going to flow based on us going over the cliff, you would think oil would start to weaken. we haven't seen that much in that respect, either. as far as the ten year, stable at 98 of 6719. finally, gold -- i don't know. bernanke is on full 85 billion a month
to $1.31 is pretty significant, language for the dollar 30, see you hitting the intraday high, u.s. consumer prices dropping for the first time in six months in november following 0.3%. the decline was driven by 7% plunge in the government's gasoline price. dave: a lot to talk about and we will get those details. dan is in the pits of the cme. jason fried telling us why european equities might be the best place to be. and brian is going to tell you how to play these markets if we go over the fiscal cliff. let's start with dan. i want to start with apple. what to you hear from folks in chicago? where is the floor? >> you are close to the floor right now. everyone panicked when apple doesn't meet some guidelines or whatever and i heard about the sock chinese opening but in fact when they come out with their figures every time they beat them, apple probably a cautious by right now, it is getting hammered and if you look at the fundamentals of that stock is relatively cheap value. liz: especially considering the pe ratio under 9, 8.8 as i last saw it but apple represents 4% of espn is
. and then next we're we'll be in wholesale locations in the u.s. and about ten countries internationally. >> r.e.i. and eastern mountain sports, that kind of thing? >> yeah. companies like that. >> we've shipped these to now 70 countries around the world. and if you go onto our site or go on to youtube you'll see all the videos people are making about how they're using them in every language you can imagine. >> let's talk emerging markets. those people -- i talked to somebody who came back from cambodia. they said it's the strangest place in the world, everybody uses wood-burning fireplaces, it's the most dangerous thing, they're polluting the sky, but that's all they have. and they also have cell phones. but they're nowhere able to charge them. >> i was in kenya not long ago and i was in a rural village, people living in traditional garb. i said how many of you have cell phones? every one of them have it. i said where's the electricity? 15 kilometers away. and when they walk there they pay 25 cents to get their cell phone charged. >> so this would be the answer. >> right. not only that, but a
us today. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: fox news alert, the world on edge and the u.s. and its allies potentially on the brink of entering another war in the middle east to prevent syria from doing the unthinkable. welcome to "america live," everyone, i'm megyn cel by. just days after he first reported on concerns syria was actually mixing chemical weapons that could kill thousands of people at a time, we get word that the regime has loaded the nerve agent into bombs that could be dropped, we don't know when. the president earlier this here, our president, called chemical weapons use a, quote, red line that would get an immediate response from the united states, and here's what the white house said about it moments ago. >> to the administration any more urgent than 48 hours ago? >> i think we've been clear all week about our concern -- well, probably longer than that, but since this has been a heighten, an issue that's getting heightened attention, we have made clear, i think, in very stark terms our concern about it. i wouldn't want to characterize our assessments bas
, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfort and pray." national newspapers also digging into this story. "the new york times" says that the peopl
didn'tou deal with the sequester earlier in i said, you mean like back in may when the u.s. house paed the only sequester replacement bill to be passed in this town. back in may. they said maybe that takes care of the sequester problem. think said what about the tax rates? i said what about in august new york a bipartisan way, we passed a bill, in this house, to extend current tax rates, to prevent tax rates from going up. i took another question from up with of the folks who said, but what about that senate bill people keep talking about? what about the senate bl? why won't that get a vote in the house. i said actually quite unusual in the rules committee you don't see it often but rules committee waived all the points of order, took all the roadblocks out of the way, in an unprecedented way to allow what we called the levin amendment, which was basically exactly the plan the president has been pushing, to raise toongs family-owned businesses, to punish job creator well, took that vote on the house floor. i'm proud to say that again in a bipartisan way republicans and democrats came t
: one pentagon official tells fox that the u.s. has made it clear to syria that if bashar al-assad uses the saran gas that would be crossing a red line, but they haven't ma it clear what the consess would be. jon. jon: ominous times in syria. molly henneberg at the pentagon, thank you. jenna: more on that as that story develops. back to washington d.c. now and the back and forth over the budget crisis there taking place behind closed doors right now on capitol hill. you have negotiators from both sides trying to hammer out a deal over tax hikes and spending cuts as the clock particulars towards that fiscal cliff deadline on january 11. mike emanuel is live. we are still getting hard lines from either side about where they stand on this. what is really happening behind the closed doors? are they closer to a dole? >> reporter: jenna you're right about a lot of tough talk in public, but behind closed doors we know the president, the speaker of the house john boehner had a phone call late yesterday, the first call they had in a week. there has not been much in the way of leaks as to what wa
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage point
the great recession with flying colors. about 30% of the dealers in the u.s. went under during the recession. isn't that extraordinary? but brunz week's dealer remained flat. they held in much better than the competition. they used the economic weakness to take share. plus the company took out $450 million in fixed costs during the downturn to come out even stronger than ever. that's the brunswick we're dealing with today. second, if higher taxes going forward mean there's slightly less demand for motorboats and fishing boats, you know what? i think that could be more than offset by the additional demand created by all those boats that sandy damaged or destroyed. and even before sandy, things were getting better for brunswick. over the last decade, the age of the average powerboat in the water has gone from 15 years old to 21 years old. wow! i thought cars at 11 years was a lot. that means there's a ton of pent-up replacement demand. we saw the same thing happen in the automobile market where the average car on the road got so old that it has led to a new surge. that's what that $15 million
, the u.s. capital -- capitol, america, your congress is in session and we're here to work. yet my republican colleagues refuse to bring up the middle class tax cut bill that is right behind me at this desk. now my colleague from texas can continue to talk about what happened in august of this year. you know, staging votes for the election, that took place. i know the results of the election. when our constituents are concerned -- what our constituents are concerned about is what happens in january, if and when we fail to do our work here now. and also, to expose that the vote that took place in august was a vote to continue the bush era tax cuts. the very same tax cuts that got us into the mess we are in right now. and they're doing that because they're holding hostage the 98% of americans who receive a tax cut under mr. walz's bill before -- that's at the desk today. and they're holding them hostage to make sure that the 2%, the wealthiest 2% don't get that tax cut. our economy is 70% driven by con -- is consumer driven. that means we -- when the middle class spends more, we all
and the accountability review board. the u.s. house of representatives committee on foreign affairs will hold a hearing on thursday, december 20 on the benghazi attacke. secretary clinton will be testifying. c-span will cover this on thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. c-span cameras will be there. front page of the national journal this morning -- on tuesday he delivered the gop talking points about the need for more spending cuts as part of any deal, while downplaying the role of raising income-tax rates on wealthier earners, which the white house trumpets often. boosting rates on the rich, he said, would provide enough money to run the government for eight days. that has nothing to do with spending, getting spending in line. other than performing requisite task, mitch mcconnell has not emerged as a huge presence in the ongoing fiscal cliff narrative. that is a change from past budget and tax deals where his finger prints were evident, a fact that could affect the final outcome or subtlety of the deal. that the national journal reporting. paul is an independent in enterprise, alabama. go ahead. calle
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
said, i think the more important question to ask is why the u.s. relies on student loans at all. >> student loans are cheaper than grants. >> i don't know and which direction he meant this, but the conversation earlier, talking about the public good of education, if they are defunding the state and city institutions and having to provide more loans, would that be another solution set you could have a free college experience? >> haunt you just have to have $200 billion to spend on it. where is the money going to come from? families, but only one source that maybe has the kind of money >> is a funding priority. their articles written about this, but health care increases, fuel costs, and prisons have become a much higher priority than education. i am not saying it as a right priority, gosh i think this is the heart of the matter. he talked about working at a public university, 73% by the state or whatever and you advance arguments for why education should be funded and, so people actually have a social contract, what do find are effective and what arguments are ineffective? >> i a
's incredible news about general motors buying $5.5 billion worth of stock from the u.s. government's t.a.r.p. program. and it was at a price $2 above where gm traded yesterday. that's right. we, the people, got a better deal than we could've ever hoped for just the day before. gm most likely would have been liquidated, putting more than a million people out of work, if the federal government hadn't bailed it out. nobody likes a bailout. people don't like to use the phrase bailout and the government isn't going to be made whole in this investment. i'm saying that point-blank. that's because it's so gigantic. the simple fact is also not only does gm exist, but it was capable of throwing off $5.5 billion to repay some of the t.a.r.p. investment. this thing was at death's door, now it's thriving, just like aig which also shouldn't have come back, but it did. those are two 2012 success stories that explain how robust corporate america really is and how unheralded that development is. what else? how about that the united states is now producing more oil than any other time in the last 17 yea
the european economies as a whole are about the same size as the u.s. which you call bonded debt, or come in a skit involved in commercial paper, bonds and other sources. five chilliness country, only one in europe. that means europe is top-heavy with banks. but that means is if you're a small company and you start to grow, you don't have the capital industry we have. you don't have the diverse sources of capital here. sue eventually give forest to become part of a big company. so you don't get the microsoft and apple on the scale we get in this country. so you look the 1970s. terrible decade. microsoft, apple, oracle, charles schwab, southwest airlines, fedex and others. a capital system can nurture them, get them to grow and be independent companies of the future. so again, europe is a 2%, weaker at 3.5 even though it had the largest economy we have the capital markets to adjust and if government ends of messing up the markets as it does when it trashes the dollar, you get new instruments to come in that deal with it and try to make money off of it. or do you stabilize the dollar? a lot
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
to take a nice quiet look at the morning papers. we'll start with the "los angeles times," the u.s. and its allies are weighing possible military action in syria after new intelligence indicates that the assad regime may be preparing to unleash chemical weapons in the ongoing civil war. president obama issued a strong warning tells president assad not to cross that red line. >>> from our parade of papers, "seattle times," flu season off to the earliest start in a decade, and the strain making the rounds tends to make people more sick than other versions, particularly dangerous for the eld elderly. typically spikes in january or february. >>> the "new york times" this holiday shopping season, toy makers are catering to a growing number of dads who are increasingly making the buying decisions for the families. one example, for the first time in 50 years, mattell has introduced construction barbie and a barbie building set designed with male shoppers in mind. some stores are being reorganized to appeal more to male sensibilities. the reason why they are shopping more is because they c
in yemen to blow up a plane bound for the u.s. has the arabian peninsula become a stronghold for the terrorist group? >> for the first time, we see al qaeda actually trying to hold territory. >> in an exclusive report, frontline examines the new al qaeda threat. >> this is al qaeda, and they control the whole city. >> "al qaeda in yemen." >> frontline continues online. explore the reporting on "cell tower deaths" from our partners at propublica, more about who's responsible for a worker's safety from osha's jordan barab, and read at&t's statement to frontline. get insights into working at mf global from a former broker. >> sipping the kool-aid at that time. >> learn more about the volckr rule, and follow frontline on facebook and twitter, or tell us what you think at pbs.org/frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful wor
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)